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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate economies by means of common currency. this is not the first time these if things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are
, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit -- at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is the same thing as -- is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. -- happen. 1 -- society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down in 2008. -- like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding together these economies. -- disparate economies by means of common currency. this is not the first time these things that happened. it happened in the u
have a $16 trillion deficit right now. we have the deficit because of social security, medicaid, medicare, welfare, food stamps -- all policies put into effect by the democratic party. everything is socialism. thomas jefferson said it best -- the republic is doomed. people sacrifice -- i'm a libertarian. i am more objective. i'm not a republican or democrats. i have to wonder if i want to live in this country. 29% of americans got some kind of assistance when ronald reagan was president. i have to consider and i'm considering moving to a tropical island and watching america go down the drain. we need to abolish social security, medicare, and medicaid. host: i will stop you there. we appreciate your thoughts. joseph says -- will go back to stay but by the president on the passing of norman schwarzkopf. host: "his legacy will e ndure." back to your calls. caller: good morning. god bless us. [indiscernible] where is the love? .e're at a church when the president and everybody was running. the church was all over the program. we're in the church. do you know what happened? when we f
taxation by using a flat tax. that way you can calculate the amount of taxes we need for the deficit over 10 years. another point is to control the spending on entitlements by not giving millionaires social security benefits, thereby satisfying president obama's approach. instead of doing it through taxation, he can do it through the entitlements. guest: those are both ideas that have been raised, especially the social security and medicare benefits for the wealthy and potentially might not need them to live off of. one tricky part of that is wealthier americans have been paying these taxes for decades into social security and medicare if and a lot of folks have a problem with the idea of taking away their benefits they have paid for if just because they happen to be more well off. and issued the first caller raised and something to watch is this could really sort of set the tone for the president's second term. if this thing gets ugly and stays ugly, it's probably going to stay that way at least another year or two, and the next thing you know, he's a lame duck president. if we cut a dea
, as well. now, the government has been running huge deficits for a while. >> i still find it fascinating looking at the basis of the actual market. given as you say we're about to enter a recession again. you brought a very, very divided and different government scenario which hopefully will be sorted out. but whether or not the japanese underperformance on the nikkei is going to continue, as well, given the comments we've had about the stimulus will flow into the economy. >> the japanese economy is still or at least the large companies are still very export oriented. if the yen depreciate appreciations, that should improve the chances for japanese companies to gain market share all over the world and that should improve earnings prospect, too, and drive up shares. i see that quite simplistic and there is upside if the yen really tanks. of course, we have to keep the currency movements in mind if you're an international investor, of course, examine japan, of course, has a domestic economy, too, which is likely to remain quite weak. that is the down side, as well. all other things being a
, the fact we've had four straight years of trillion dollars plus deficits, when the president says he wants to raise taxes on those $250,000 or above, that only generates $850 billion over the next ten years. we have had 1.422, 1.29 and on the way to another trillion dollars deficit for these years. what the president is proposing is not pragmatic whatsoever and really is a reflection of him i suppose living in a fantasy world. >> what do you think the deal that speaker boehner offered the president? >> well, i was against the plan b because i don't see this as being a tax revenue increase issue. most important is spending. we could georgia back -- go back to the simpson bowles commission. the most important thing, we have to deal with spending. we live in an america where the federal government now is spending 25% of our gross domestic product. when you study the obama budget that would increase to 32%. that's where the problem has to i am emanate from. the spending side of our budget is 62% of what we spend money on. it's not just about defense or discretionary. >> is there any indication
serious about cutting the defsht and deficit? >> this is, look, this is the greatest irony of this entire discussion. and it is getting lost too much i think in the sometimes in the weeds of the back and forth negotiations. remember, the reason that we're doing this is because this grew out of the 2010 elections and debates over raising debt ceiling that following summer, 2011. the entire purpose was to reduce the size and scope of government in a way responsible to the voters of that midterm election. instead what we're almost certain to see is an expansion of government in the name of reintroducing it. we're likely to see much bigger government long term. we're not likely to deal with entitlement reforms as we need to do. as you suggest the president is pushing some short-term spending increases often in washington turn into long-term spending increases. gregg: but, steve, bill kristol, conservative, you know what, time to throw in the towel. you do not want to get blamed for raising taxes on 98% of americans. >> right. gregg: right? >> look, bill kristol is my boss and editor at "the w
and there will still be an enormous amount of work to do both on deficit reduction and tax reform, not to mention dealing with massive spending cuts which by most accounts are not likely to be involved in the agreement. don't know that for sure, but that's our understanding going in, martin. >> i think it's a safe bet. both sides have different wants. so what's holding these two sides apart when the this he know that so very much is on the line for everyday americans? >> it's a great question. i mean, what's really holding them apart are massive ideological differences. this is about government's role in your life. democrats want more of a social safety net, republicans prioritize lower taxes. and that's what distinguishes the democratic and the republican parties sop so that's what they're fundamentally fighting about. if you break it down to the basic deal points right now, democrats say this smaller deal should include a tax increase for households that make $250,000 and more. an extension of unemployment benefits as you pointed out for about 2 million americans, a delay of those massive spend
while extending unemployment insurance and laying the groundwork for deficit reduction. >> i expect democrats and republicans to get back to washington and have it pass both chambers. and i will immediately sign that legislation into law. >> reporter: house speaker john boehner also headed home after a bruising week. his own conference refused to back his proposal, which would have allowed taxes to go up on the wealthy, delivering a stinging blow to his leadership. today he faulted the president and congressional democrats for the impasse. >> unfortunately, the president and senate democrats have vowed to reject and veto all of our proposals while failing to offer responsible solutions of their own. >> reporter: the prospects for a deal remain grim. on friday senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said his strategy forward is unclear, but stressed time is running out. >> the u.s. economy is at stake here. millions upon millions of families are counting on us to do something. >> reporter: while the president expressed measured confidence -- >> call me a hopeless optimist but i actu
year we were in a deficit situation and we really needed to make up some ground. luckily we have a lot of ground water storage capacity. this series of storms have helped with the reservoir capacity. >>> a member of the alpine meadow ski patrol has died after being buried in an avalanche. bill foster died overnight at a reno hospital. yet the ski patrol used explosives to trigger the avalanche in a private area of the resort near lake tahoe. resort officials say the avalanche broke much higher and wider on the slope than expected burying foster in the snow. >>> we'll go to the sierra for updates on conditions there tonight as this latest storm bringing everyone more snow to the high country. you can get the latest weather conditions any time online or on your mobile device at ktvu.com. look for the link to storm tracker 2 near the top of the page. you can also follow us on twitter. we postupdates on the ktvu channel 2 facebook page. >>> police found dozens of shell casings on the ground where a man was shot and killed. neighbors told our photographer that they heard multiple gunshots.
-term deficits and debt. we're going to get a patch and be here again in two months. congress can't get out of its own way. we keep setting our own traps. >> john, we appreciate the clarity, even if it's depressing. thank you very much. >>> a lot of other news developing overnight. for that, let's check in, as always, with mr. ron claiborne. >> hi, dan, bianna. we begin in australia, with a confrontation with a shark. it cost a surfer two fingers and a chunk of his leg. the 29-year-old was surrounded by a pod of dolphins when the shark attacked yesterday. >> my legs. >> and witnesses say the man used his surfboard to fight off the shark. but the shark bit off two of his fingers. >>> and police in new york city are searching for a woman who pushed a man to his death in front of an oncoming subway train. police are checking homeless shelters and psychiatric units for the woman seen in this surveillance video running away from the scene of that crime. authorities released a sketch of that suspect. investigators used a smartphone and a bottle prescription pills to identify the victim. he is the
insurance for americans looking for a job and lays the ground work for more economic growth and deficit reduction. >> the president is optimistic that a deal can be reached midnight on new year's eve. listen to senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. >> we had a good meeting down at the white house. engaged in discussions in the hopes we can come forward as early as sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference and the majority leader can make to his conference. >> and the senate is set to reconvene sunday at 1:00 eastern time. the house also expected to be in session on sunday. they'll start at 2:00 eastern time with the first votes coming at 6:30. let's head up to capitol hill. mike viqueira is there. so what? even if they reach a deal today or tomorrow? do we have time to get this dup? >> i think so, t.j. if they sign off from everybody in the senate. if everybody stands up, no & nobody objects. they call it unanimous consent around here. they can wave their hansory anything. badda bing, badda boom. it's out of here. you look at senate leaders on the floor, and yo
-term deficits and debt. we weren't that far from a deal two weeks ago. but we are today. we're going to get a patch and be here again in two months. congress can't get out of its own way. we keep setting our own traps. and we can't find a way to reason together. >> john, we appreciate the clarity, even if it's depressing. thank you very much. john avlon. >>> a lot of other news developing overnight. for that, let's check in, as always, with mr. ron claiborne. good morning, sir. >> hi, dan, bianna. mr. avalon, good morning, everyone. we begin in australia, with a confrontation with a shark. it cost a surfer two fingers and a chunk of his leg. the 29-year-old was surrounded by a pod of dolphins when the shark attacked yesterday. >> are you all right? >> yeah, i got my legs. i'm good. >> and witnesses say the man used his surfboard to fight off the shark. but the shark bit off two of his fingers. and sank its teeth into his legs. other surfers came to the man's aid until paramedics arrived. >>> and police in new york city are searching for a woman who pushed a man to his death in front of an o
, who are providing us also with the means to float the deficit. these are the people providing a lot of our financing. well, at some point if this goes on long enough, they begin to think, hold it. >> who's writing a lot of our financing? >> mainly foreign governments as well as markets. holding on to treasuries and the rest. so the question, then, at some point do they go, hold it. if these guys aren't serious, why am i depending upon them so much? and the scariest single scenario is ultimately people start saying before i continue to float the united states, i want to get a slightly higher return to take -- in order to -- because of this risk. because of this uncertainty. that is the day the spiral begins because that's the day mr. bernanke and his colleagues have to think about raising rates in order to attract the necessary financing. we don't want to get there. and what's so scary about this twofer of the cliff and the debt ceiling over the next two months, basically till the end of february, is for the rest of the world looking at us, we essentially have -- it's not so much nex
deficit with china hit another record in 2011 with the value of chinese imports rising to almost $400 billion. but u.s. exports to china are also hitting record highs. >> china is now our third largest export market. and i don't think a lot of americans realize that. >> reporter: in fact, since the year 2000, 47 states have reported at least triple-digit export growth to china. including minnesota. the home of red wing shoes. >> china exports red wing shoe company have really taken off in the last five years. >> reporter: for red wing, the key is quality control. it says chinese-made products just don't measure up. >> the boots don't last as long. we are known for our leather. it's just a higher quality leather that's appreciated by that chinese customer. >> reporter: back in new york, fashion designer patrick ervel says his growing chinese fan base looks not only for quality but designs they can't find at home. >> now there is a bit of a cache, not just an american designer, but if you're manufacturing here, especially in menswear. >> reporter: why? >> just this idea of made in ameri
family would pay 2,000 to $4,000 more in taxes next year. but, if you're a deficit hawk, you might be happy with this news. the congressional budget office estimates that with all of these new tax revenues, plus those mandatory spending cuts kicking in january 1st, that would all cut the deficit in half next year to about $600 billion. kelly? kelly: we would go through this for about half a year. then there's a talk among some people, that we would actually rebound at the end of six months or so. but that is a lot of pain to go through. is there any idea of what could happen to the economy or stock market as a result of congressional inactivity? >> well, yeah. the cb. off and many private economists say that the $600 billion in fiscal tighting, as you say would push the economy into recession next year and send the unemmoment rate to back above 9%. a survey of investment managers found 60% of the them see a drop in the dow industrials of 10% or more if the cliff is not avoided. kelly? kelly: boy, that is very ominous. peter, thank you. hopefully something can be done. peter barnes.
, realistically can there be a grandiose bill that will attempt to solve our spending, deficit problem, with the overall framework? or talking about a band-aid? >> personally, i don't think we'll get the big plan in the next six days. it would be great if we could. >> the whole enchilada. but at least if we can get an appetizer -- no, seriously. if we can get assurance that realistic work is being done to provide tax relief, regulatory relief. the two big laws passed previously in 2010. affordable care act, well intentioned, very costly and those are posing problems too. >> earlier this week, we spoke with grover norquist. you signed the pledge not to sign taxes. >> i did. >> he supported speaker boehner's plan "b" and said it wouldn't violate his pledge. here's what he told us earlier this week. listen. >> i think in fact, plan "b" is a good step to protecting tax cuts for everybody. >> if you look at current law, current law says as we all know, part of the fiscal cliff '01, '03 tax relief measures will expire on january 1st. at this point, everybody's taxes go up. we all know that.
. the tax would have made the rich contribute a whole lot more to cutting public deficit. >> arthel: here at home as senator leaders work behind closed doors to cut an 11th hour deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, we got a glimpse of optimism on the senate floor on friday from majority leader harry reid and minority leader mitch mcconnell following their white house meeting with president obama. here it is. >> everyone knows we've been to the white house. we've had a constructive meeting. we certainly hope that something will positive will come from that. >> i share the view of the majority leader. we had a good meeting at the white house. we are engaged in discussions, the majority leader and myself and the white house in the hopes that we can come forward as early as sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference and the majority leader can make to his conference. >> arthel: so is a fiscal deal more likely now than it was before congress left for christmas break? let's have a meeting of the minds. outreach director for freedom works, author of "backlash" and fox news cont
the past year, we have seen great progress [inaudible] leading the way. but just as the u.k. deficit is not balanced with the government public transport issue are not solved in one year. we're public transport continued a national priority. we can't -- [inaudible] for the like of my young cousin. we can deliver more transport to get students from point a to point b. we can build a better, brighter future for young people. so when the opposition argument say it's not a national campaign, a focus of the divided region. i tell you this, divided we are weak, but united are the nation we are strong. more nation, one notion, one campaign. better public transport. [applause] [applause] >> thank you very much ib keyed for that. i note we have been joined by the former government chief when the labour party was in office nick browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly
are tough questions to answer. my priority is always education and our long term problems. i'm not a deficit hawk. people on both sides do bothwell. i don't understand the fuss about raising the age qualification for social security are medicare. and plead with the caps -- simply lift the caps. franklin roosevelt to not want to be called a socialist. if we just lived in those caps, we would delay -- i can remember the exact numbers. for several decades, anyway. i think that would be less painful than raising the qualified age. medicare is the toughest because of health care costs have been skyrocketing. our country's health care cost is rising faster than any other industrial nation. we don't have much coronation. obamacare had to be cobbled together to appease everybody. we have it and we should be focusing on ways to make our health care more efficient and i think we will. these are all tough problems but they need to be handled. being president is like playing three-dimensional chess. maybe four dimensions. caller: thank you, c-span. is the last year, didn't the president give over $1 tri
to people in united states of america who are in need of help, or help reduce the deficit that was testified to be the greatest national security threat to the united states of america. it is a matter of priorities. i appreciate the very noble -- i emphasize the word noble -- effort to help people who are in harm's also way in various parts of the world. my colleague from florida mentioned somalia. certainly in vietnam we tried to do the noble things. we're in a different financial reality. in the absence of a national security interest in the congo, i am afraid that sequestration will force us to retract even though we may wish to the contrary. i yield back the remainder of my time. >> a couple of questions. sequestration is not only obama's, but also our responsibility. i believe we voted for it. >> i did not vote for it. >> we talked about this whole issue. it has been suggested that perhaps -- >> $80 million. is that more or less correct? [indiscernible] >> we will hear that in a few moments. if that is correct, i would point out that this really is a national security issue for america
progress [inaudible] leading the way. but just as the u.k. deficit is not balanced with the government public transport issue are not solved in one year. we're public transport continued a national priority. we can't -- [inaudible] for the like of my young cousin. we can deliver more transport to get students from point a to point b. we can build a better, brighter future for young people. so when the opposition argument say it's not a national campaign, a focus of the divided region. i tell you this, divided we are weak, but united are the nation we are strong. more nation, one notion, one campaign. better public transport. [applause] [applause] >> thank you very much ib keyed for that. i note we have been joined by the former government chief when the labour party was in office nick browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly represent. but, -- the parliament ca
to the debt and deficit. what impact does that have? >> i think that have essentially no impact. the u.s. has been growing since june of 2009. this is not a case where the government needs to step in and stop a free fall. the problem is we're growing too slowly. we are growing at rates that are 1, 1.5, 2%, and we should be growing at rates of 3 and 4%. to do that we need permanent fixes. fixes to entitlement programs, tax reform, that's the recipe for more rapid growth. it's also the same recipe for fixing the debt. gregg: how about 7 and 8% growth which is what happened this ronald reagan reduced the tabgts rates. the tax rates. >> that would be phenomenal. we haven't seen that since the 1980s. it will take a very big pla change in the playbook in washington for that to happen h. gregg: thank you very much. >> thank you. gregg: what will it cost you if washington can't make a deal before next week, something that is looking more and more likely? you can find out all you need to know on our website foxnews.com/politics. patti ann: new details now on a technological brea breakthrough that has
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)